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Rambling down the rabbit hole, following the scent of ideas and joy. My name is Daria or Eddie or Cera or Possumboots.
An excellent blog post by Martha Knox about her attempt at a vaginal birth after c-section (VBAC) and its associated risks, she also highlights the importance of health practitioners in fully explaining the risks and benefits to mothers so that they can make a truly informed decision. As well as commonly spread misinformation in the natural birth world. The safest place to attempt a VBAC is in a hospital where that is able to cope with emergency situations such as uterine rupture. 

An excellent blog post by Martha Knox about her attempt at a vaginal birth after c-section (VBAC) and its associated risks, she also highlights the importance of health practitioners in fully explaining the risks and benefits to mothers so that they can make a truly informed decision. As well as commonly spread misinformation in the natural birth world. The safest place to attempt a VBAC is in a hospital where that is able to cope with emergency situations such as uterine rupture. 

17 hours ago
0 notes
The Lessons we Learn

lukeablett:

Over the past two years, there have been two distinct, yet related discussions regarding violence in the Australian community. The first was violence against women, which in the light of some very high profile cases, as well as the continual sexism aimed at former Prime Minister, Julia Gillard,…

Another great post by Luke Abblett on violence & masculinity.

1 week ago
6 notes
A (long) but excellent article about the importance of children taking age appropriate risks in their play and adventure from an early age in order to allow them to develop the resilience, problem solving skills and self confidence to manage the more intense risks present in adolescence and young adulthood. It helps children overcome phobias through gradual exposure to fears on their own terms. Some OTs, psychologist, paeds & others at the Sydney Uni have developed a project called the Sydney Playground Project to help parents and schools reframe risk and create spaces for physical creative play for kids. Think about your own childhood and the activities you did, yes bad things happen sometimes but more often than not as a child you didn’t take a risk that you weren’t ready for & when you broke your arm or had to go to ER for stitches in your head generally you were considered a playground legend  Fear of litigation has a lot to answer for in how we now supervise and design play areas for kids. 

The irony is despite our current preoccupation with safety the numbers of kids going to the ER hasn’t changed much. It has changed in areas where it should (e.g. seat belts improving car safety, pool fences reducing accidental drowning, helmets preventing head injury, abduction by strangers is on a downward trend but family violence is still prevalent). Loss of community and fewer public spaces has added to the loss of trust that kids can just ‘be’. 

"One common concern of parents these days is that children grow up too fast. But sometimes it seems as if children don’t get the space to grow up at all; they just become adept at mimicking the habits of adulthood. As Hart’s research shows, children used to gradually take on responsibilities, year by year. They crossed the road, went to the store; eventually some of them got small neighborhood jobs. Their pride was wrapped up in competence and independence, which grew as they tried and mastered activities they hadn’t known how to do the previous year. But these days, middle-class children, at least, skip these milestones. They spend a lot of time in the company of adults, so they can talk and think like them, but they never build up the confidence to be truly independent and self-reliant." 
Photo: “kids playing in the dirt” by Chris Enns 2009

A (long) but excellent article about the importance of children taking age appropriate risks in their play and adventure from an early age in order to allow them to develop the resilience, problem solving skills and self confidence to manage the more intense risks present in adolescence and young adulthood. It helps children overcome phobias through gradual exposure to fears on their own terms. Some OTs, psychologist, paeds & others at the Sydney Uni have developed a project called the Sydney Playground Project to help parents and schools reframe risk and create spaces for physical creative play for kids. Think about your own childhood and the activities you did, yes bad things happen sometimes but more often than not as a child you didn’t take a risk that you weren’t ready for & when you broke your arm or had to go to ER for stitches in your head generally you were considered a playground legend  Fear of litigation has a lot to answer for in how we now supervise and design play areas for kids. 

The irony is despite our current preoccupation with safety the numbers of kids going to the ER hasn’t changed much. It has changed in areas where it should (e.g. seat belts improving car safety, pool fences reducing accidental drowning, helmets preventing head injury, abduction by strangers is on a downward trend but family violence is still prevalent). Loss of community and fewer public spaces has added to the loss of trust that kids can just ‘be’. 

"One common concern of parents these days is that children grow up too fast. But sometimes it seems as if children don’t get the space to grow up at all; they just become adept at mimicking the habits of adulthood. As Hart’s research shows, children used to gradually take on responsibilities, year by year. They crossed the road, went to the store; eventually some of them got small neighborhood jobs. Their pride was wrapped up in competence and independence, which grew as they tried and mastered activities they hadn’t known how to do the previous year. But these days, middle-class children, at least, skip these milestones. They spend a lot of time in the company of adults, so they can talk and think like them, but they never build up the confidence to be truly independent and self-reliant." 

Photo: “kids playing in the dirt” by Chris Enns 2009

1 week ago
0 notes
This graph from 2000 is crazy!
More than 25% of kids in USA & 25% of kids in UK live in relative poverty. No wonder the health systems in those countries are under such stress when we know that social exclusion through poverty leads to higher rates of disease and premature death. Read more in the WHO publication Social Determinants of Health: the Solid Facts (2nd edition). 

This graph from 2000 is crazy!

More than 25% of kids in USA & 25% of kids in UK live in relative poverty. No wonder the health systems in those countries are under such stress when we know that social exclusion through poverty leads to higher rates of disease and premature death. Read more in the WHO publication Social Determinants of Health: the Solid Facts (2nd edition). 

2 weeks ago
0 notes

I can’t wait for The Grand Hotel Budapest.

nprfreshair
:

In a conversation with director Wes Anderson Terry asked why he often has his characters look at the camera/audience head-on. Here’s what he says:

"I have my own way of blocking things and framing things that’s built into me. I compare it to handwriting. I don’t fully understand it — why my handwriting is like this — but in a way there’s some sort of tonal thing with the kind of stories I do. They tend to have some fable element and I think my visual predilections are somehow related to trying to make that tone and make my own writing work with performers."

Photos of The Royal Tenenbaums, The Life Aquatic, The Darjeeling Limited, and The Grand Budapest Hotel

1 month ago
1,699 notes
Friends #streetart #melbourne

Friends #streetart #melbourne

1 month ago
0 notes
Found a complete nautilus shell, didn’t take it home, too many creatures on it. #puppies #beach #nature

Found a complete nautilus shell, didn’t take it home, too many creatures on it. #puppies #beach #nature

1 month ago
1 note
What will be another chapter in our own Horrible History… Mandatory detention of asylum seekers is not a solution just a cruel and undignified practice. Waleed Aly presents in this article for the Sydney Morning Herald the uncomfortable truth about the inherent nature of Australia’s off shore processing policies. The reality is that the crux of the policy is to deter asylum seekers by offering up a fate that’s less desirable than the horrors they are fleeing. The whole situation is an inhumane mess that needs a whole lot more than a Royal Commission to be sorted out and unfortunately it seems many Australians feel these brutal approaches are justified. These policies are costing Australia in an economically and socially. Amnesty International has condemned our country’s actions and rightly so. It has never been ok in a global sense to detain people without explanation and clear timelines. Personally I see the recent riots and unrest as being the logical outcome of such inhumane treatment. Shame Australia. The UNHCR has also condemned the detention centre on Manus Island in their report which points out that detaining people on an open-ended basis without individual assessment amounts to a breach of international law. It also raises concerns about the possibility of resettling people found to be refugees in PNG (the Abbot government’s current policy). At the very minimum clear dates for processing need to be provided to current detainees as it seems this level of uncertainty is one largest contributors to dissonance and poor mental health among the detainee population. Even previous Liberal Prime Minister Malcom Fraser knows the current situations is dangerous and inhumane. How long will this horror continue? 

What will be another chapter in our own Horrible History… Mandatory detention of asylum seekers is not a solution just a cruel and undignified practice. 

Waleed Aly presents in this article for the Sydney Morning Herald the uncomfortable truth about the inherent nature of Australia’s off shore processing policies. The reality is that the crux of the policy is to deter asylum seekers by offering up a fate that’s less desirable than the horrors they are fleeing. The whole situation is an inhumane mess that needs a whole lot more than a Royal Commission to be sorted out and unfortunately it seems many Australians feel these brutal approaches are justified. These policies are costing Australia in an economically and socially. Amnesty International has condemned our country’s actions and rightly so. It has never been ok in a global sense to detain people without explanation and clear timelines. Personally I see the recent riots and unrest as being the logical outcome of such inhumane treatment. Shame Australia. The UNHCR has also condemned the detention centre on Manus Island in their report which points out that detaining people on an open-ended basis without individual assessment amounts to a breach of international law. It also raises concerns about the possibility of resettling people found to be refugees in PNG (the Abbot government’s current policy). At the very minimum clear dates for processing need to be provided to current detainees as it seems this level of uncertainty is one largest contributors to dissonance and poor mental health among the detainee population. Even previous Liberal Prime Minister Malcom Fraser knows the current situations is dangerous and inhumane. How long will this horror continue? 

1 month ago
14 notes
Gorgeous Byron #bliss #nature #byronbay

Gorgeous Byron #bliss #nature #byronbay

2 days ago
0 notes
The Secret Footballer does not Speak for Me

lukeablett:

Last month, journalist Natalie Barr wrote that she had never experienced sexism throughout her professional career, and that women should “stop blaming men for their troubles”, as the headline read. In response, Barr was criticised for assuming that her experiences were representative of the…

Love your work Luke!

1 week ago
33 notes
Love this article, "5 Signs Your Gluten Allergy Is Fake". You know aside from the obvious… you’ve never received a diagnosis from a doctor! Having Coeliac’s disease is not cool & causes sufferers a lot of dramas. Gluten intolerance is not really a thing. I think people who like #5 in the article “just feel better’ without gluten actually mean “I feel better when I eat more vegetables and whole foods”. Some people can react to gluten due to sensitivities related to quite specific disorders and in trying to get on top of these working with a general practitioner and a dietician would be the best way of fully getting in control of their dietary issues.

Love this article, "5 Signs Your Gluten Allergy Is Fake". You know aside from the obvious… you’ve never received a diagnosis from a doctor! Having Coeliac’s disease is not cool & causes sufferers a lot of dramas. Gluten intolerance is not really a thing. I think people who like #5 in the article “just feel better’ without gluten actually mean “I feel better when I eat more vegetables and whole foods”. Some people can react to gluten due to sensitivities related to quite specific disorders and in trying to get on top of these working with a general practitioner and a dietician would be the best way of fully getting in control of their dietary issues.

1 week ago
0 notes
Sunday evening dinner date spot #ballina #datenight #beach

Sunday evening dinner date spot #ballina #datenight #beach

4 weeks ago
0 notes
Salted Caramel Macaron gelato at #Brunetti #carlton #bliss

Salted Caramel Macaron gelato at #Brunetti #carlton #bliss

1 month ago
0 notes
#tacotime delicious way to end an inspiring day of learning about #adolescent #health at RCH Melb.

#tacotime delicious way to end an inspiring day of learning about #adolescent #health at RCH Melb.

1 month ago
0 notes
carlosands:

Australia right now.

carlosands:

Australia right now.

1 month ago
16 notes